Data Types, Variables, and Constants

In the previous blog post where we calculated the area of the last of the nine circles of hell, we used as data the value of PI and the radius, and found how large was Treachery. For each of these values, we assigned a name.

We also used the Java keyword double, which defines the data type of the data. The keyword double means that the value will be a floating-point number.

Java allows you to refer to the data in a program by defining variables, which are named locations in memory where you can store values. A variable can store one data value at a time, but that value might change as the program executes, and it might change from one execution of the program to the next. The real advantage of using variables is that you can name a variable, assign it a value, and subsequently refer to the name of the variable in an expression rather than hard-coding the specific value.

When we use a named variable, we need to tell the compiler which kind of data we will store in the variable. We do this by giving a data type for each variable. Java supports eight primitive data types: byte, short, int, long, float, double, char, and boolean. They are called primitive data types because they are part of the core Java language. The data type you specify for a variable tells the compiler how much memory to allocate and the format in which to store the data.

For example, if you specify that a data item is an int, then the compiler will allocate four bytes of memory for it and store its value as a 32-bit signed binary number. If, however, you specify that a data item is a double (a double-precision floating-point number), then the compiler will allocate 8 bytes of memory and store its value as an IEEE 754 floating-point number. Once you declare a data type for a data item, the compiler will monitor your use of that data item. If you attempt to perform operations that are not allowed for that type or are not compatible with that type, the compiler will generate an error.

Because the Java compiler monitors the operations on each data item, Java is called a strongly typed language. Take care in selecting identifiers for your programs. The identifiers should be meaningful and should reflect the data that will be stored in a variable, the concept encapsulated by a class, or the function of a method.

For example, the identifier age clearly indicates that the variable will hold an age. When you select meaningful variable names, the logic of your program is more easily understood, and you are less likely to introduce errors. Sometimes, it may be necessary to create a long identifier in order to clearly indicate its use, for example, numberOfPeopleSignedUpForCryonics. Although the length of identifiers is essentially unlimited, avoid creating extremely long identifiers because the longer the identifier, the more likely you are to make typos when entering the identifier into your program and the more it takes to type it, swallowing precious time. Finally, although it is legal to use identifiers, such as TRUE, which differ from Java keywords only in case, it isn’t a good idea because they easily can be confused with Java keywords, making the program logic less clear.

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